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Structure and Reactiviti of Large Biomolecule Ions in the Gas Phase

presented by

Evan Williams
University of California, Berkeley

April 12, 1996

The Scripps Research Institute, W.M. Keck Foundation Amphitheater


Background:

Evan Williams graduated from the University of Virginia with a B.S. in Chemistry in 1984. He then went on to Cornell where he completed both an M.S. in Chemistry and a Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry under the direction of Fred W. McLafferty. Dr. Williams was an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University from 1989-1991 and has now been at UC Berkeley since January, 1992.Among Dr. Williams current interests are the development of novel instrumental and computational techniques in mass spec, tandem m.s., chromatography, and laser spectroscopy for probing the structure and function of large biomolecules. He is also applying new dissociation methods for direct protein and DNA sequencing, ion-molecule chemistry towards the investigation of electrostatic interactions in biomolecules, and has an interest in developing novel sample introduction techniques for interfacing liquid chromatography methods (e.g., capillary electrophoresis) with mass spectrometry. Combining all of these areas with the design of new experiments and curricula for both undergraduate and graduate chemistry courses keeps Dr. Williams on the cutting edge of mass spectrometry.

Abstract:

The combination of electro- spray ionization with Fourier-transform mass spectrometry has become a powerful method for the structural character-ization of large biomolecules, even those present in complex mixtures and at trace levels. The ability of FTMS to store ions for long periods of time makes possible unique experi ments for their structural characterization. Among these are slow ion-molecule reactions and a new experiment named blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD) that enables direct measurement information of activation energies and dynamics of thermal dissociation.

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